The decision whether Britain should leave or remain in the European Union was a decision that was made by the whole country in a referendum in 2016, when a clear majority voted to leave.

Following this, the House of Commons voted in 2018 to trigger Article 50 and thereby to commence the legal process to leave the EU.

The vote that took place this January and subsequently on the Prime Minister’s proposed deal was therefore not about whether Britain leaves the EU but was about the terms upon which this should take place.

Many MPs are unhappy about what Mrs May is proposing and are concerned that there is potentially an indefinite ‘backstop’ arrangement, where the EU holds a veto over our ability to exit.  The terms of the proposals also amount to the UK accepting an amalgam of the EU Customs Union and Single Market obligations.

Unfortunately, since the decision to leave was made, a number of MPs have tried to thwart the process because they disagree with it.

The whole parliamentary process has therefore become bogged down with some MPs engineering votes on whether to delay leaving the EU, whether to have a second referendum, or whether to abandon Brexit altogether.

So, it looks like a parliamentary stalemate has been reached as to the way forward. However, Britain has already given the EU notice that we are leaving so if no further agreements are reached, Britain will exit the EU without a deal on the 12th April.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

The 2016 national referendum result was:

REMAIN: 48% LEAVE 52%

The result in East Yorkshire was an even bigger vote for leave, namely

REMAIN: 39.6% LEAVE: 60.4%

If you want to know more, or wish to let Greg know your views on this matter, then please send an email to: secretary@gregknight.com